10 Group Stations of the the Battle of Britain

The Group pages begin with a sector map explaining the Group's structure and how the chain of command worked. The stations are split into Sector stations, Fighter stations, Chain Home and Chain Home Low RDF sites. To see the details of each station, click on its name on the map, or scroll down the list, which is arranged alphabetically in categories.

Group Headquarters

10 Group Headquarters was based at RAF Box, the administrative centre.


Sector Airfields

RAF Filton.

RAF Filton was home to the Filton Sector Operations Room and Staff, and the following Squadrons during the Battle:

  • No 504 Squadron from 26 September 1940

RAF Middle Wallop.

RAF Middle Wallop was home to the Middle Wallop Sector Operations Room and Staff, and the following Squadrons during the Battle:

  • No 236 Squadron from 14 June 1940
  • No 238 Squadron from 20 June 1940
  • No 401 Squadron RCAF from 21 June 1940
  • No 501 Squadron from 4 July 1940
  • No 609 Squadron from 5 July 1940
  • No 604 Squadron from 26 July 1940
  • No 222 Squadron from 13 August 1940
  • No 238 Squadron from 10 September 1940
  • No 23 Squadron from 12 September to 25 September 1940

Fighter Airfields

RAF Boscombe Down.

RAF Boscombe Down was home to the following Squadrons during the Battle:

  • No 249 Squadron from 14 August 1940
  • No 56 Squadron from 1 September 1940

RAF Colerne.

RAF Colerne was used as a satellite and relief airfield for Middle Wallop during the Battle, units rotated in and out of the station on a daily basis.

RAF Exeter.

RAF Exeter was home to the following Squadrons during the Battle:

  • No 213 Squadron from 18 June 1940
  • No 87 Squadron from 5 July 1940
  • No 601 Squadron from 7 September 1940

RAF Pembrey.

RAF Pembrey was home to the following Squadrons during the Battle:

  • No 92 Squadron from 18 June 1940
  • No 79 Squadron from 8 September 1940

RAF Roborough.

RAF Roborough was home to the following Squadrons during the Battle:

  • No 247 Squadron from 1 August 1940

RAF St Eval.

RAF St Eval was home to the following Squadrons during the Battle:

  • No 222 Squadron from 18 June 1940
  • No 236 Squadron from 8 August 1940
  • No 238 Squadron from 14 August 1940
  • No 222 Squadron from 11 September 1940

RAF Warmwell.

RAF Warmwell was home to the following Squadrons during the Battle:

  • No 152 Squadron from 12 July 1940

Chain Home Stations

RAF Hawks Tor.

Hawks Tor provided long range early warning for Plymouth, Exeter and the south coast of Cornwall and Devon, as well as the southern aspect of the Western Approaches.

RAF Haycastle.

Haycastle provided long range early warning for the southern Irish Sea.

RAF Warren.

Warren provided long range early warning for the Western Approaches and the Bristol Channel.

RAF Worth.

Worth provided long range early warning for the south coast from Weymouth to Southampton, and faced the Cherbourg Peninsula, home of the fighter squadrons of Luftflotte III.


Chain Home Low Stations

RAF Carnaton.

Carnaton provided low level raid cover for the north coast of Cornwall and the southern half of the Bristol Channel Approaches.

RAF Drytree.

Drytree provided low level raid cover for the south coast of Cornwall and the Western Approaches.

RAF Rame Head.

Rame Head provided low level raid cover for the Plymouth area.

RAF Strumble Head.

Strumble Head provided low level raid cover for Cardigan bay, the southern Irish Sea, and is still in use today as a CAA radar station.

RAF St Twynells.

St Twynells provided low level raid cover for the approaches to the Bristol Channel and the ports of Swansea and Cardiff.

RAF West Prawle.

West Prawle provided low level raid cover for the approaches to Exeter and Plymouth.